Sunday, March 5, 2017


 Reflection for Week of February 28th through March 3rd

How did you do on your work?
This week was largely spent on the PCR lab, and while I had a lot of fun doing it, and I thought I did it well, I was disappointed that I didn't get any real data. I felt like I had a really good grasp of PCR, and I felt pretty confident on the quiz as well. The virus vodcast made a lot of sense to me as well, besides a few specifics that I think I can get that cleared up soon.

What do you think you understand well?
I understand PCR really well I think, and I feel pretty confident on actually performing it as well. I also think viruses made a lot of sense to me, though I think I need to back that up a little bit more. Otherwise, I'm feeling pretty good about where I am.

Where do you think you can improve?
In terms of improvement, I need to get a better grasp of the lab we are completing. I understood everything that had to do with PCR, but right now I feel like I'm not getting the bigger picture of what the analysis is and how it is translating into a major write up lab. 
 
What strategies will you use to improve?
 I think my understanding of the lab could improve if I reread everything we did in class. I think I was rushing for most of it and didn't take the time to fully comprehend what we were doing at the time. I'll also try to thoroughly answer the questions that go with it, because I think that will help me further understand it as well.

How does the work we are doing fit into the context/narrative of the course?
The work we are currently doing pulls everything back into the genetics part of the course, especially with Hardy Weinberg and even chromosomes and DNA replication. PCR also fits well into our look into modern day science, as it is utilized often in the science world. Learning about cloning, etc. puts a new spin onto DNA replication and the reproduction we had previously learned about. Also, the new information about the ethics of "designer babies" is a different perspective about the randomness of replication.

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